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The young and the limping

Hi All,

Oscar here. Remember that crazy soap opera, The Young and the Restless? Is that show even still on anymore? Im far too high class to watch useless drivel like that. But that doesnt mean I wont rip off the name of their program as a clever play on the subject of this weeks post.

This is in fact the story of a young dog named Izzy, a 6 month old mini-pug (yes they do exist and yes, they are friggin ADORABLE), who recently limped into the PPAC. Dr. S. checked Izzy out and found that though he had no history of injury or exposure to ticks (so no chance of lyme-disease), both of which could result in a limp, he was still limping for some reason. He also found that Izzy experienced pain when his left hip was manipulated.

The good doctor proceeded to take an X-ray and found that the neck of the femur (thigh bone) looked riddled with little holes (similar to how moth-eaten clothing looks). This conundrum is caused by something called Legg-Perthes disease which is a developmental disease in young, small-breed dogs (like pugs and miniature poodles), caused by a lack of circulation to the bone. Without circulation, the bones can die causing instability to the joint. This causes pain in the pooch and makes the dog limp.

The treatment for this condition is removal of the head and neck of the thigh-bone and the formation of a false joint made out of scar tissue. This is common in small dogs but because they are so small (and because they walk on four legs rather than two), they are able to compensate for the lack of a stable joint and Izzy will proceed to live a happy, limp- free life.

If you are the proud owner of one of these itty bitty guys and you notice them limping, fret not! Head into the PPAC for a checkup.

Til next time,

Oscar

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