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My-O My-O Myoglobin

Hi All,

Oscar here.

As you all know, I try to be as apolitical as possible—doesn't seem like a cat's place to be anything but. That said, there are certain conditions that afflict male pets and not female pets and vice versa, so this week's post has a somewhat gendered take to it, which is ironically timely given what's happening in the news. But let's just take a moment to acknowledge the irony that you never hear about cats or dogs being accused of sexual harassment. And yet we're called animals!? But I digress.

So, last week, a little seven lb. male neutered Yorkie came into the PPAC with concerned parents saying he kept peeing blood. When blood is visible in the urine, the first assumption is that it's being caused by a urinary tract infection—a condition far more often associated with females than males. The second guess was that it might be bladder kidney stone. Well, an ultrasound later revealed that the bloody urine was being caused by neither stones nor an infection.

Next up was blood work. The blood work revealed that the pooch had high levels of an enzyme associated with muscle in his system which was evidence of muscle destruction. It turned out that the pooch lived in a multi-dog residence and that the other dog in the home, in a decision to not pick on someone his own size, had attacked the little pooch. As a result, the Yorkie's muscles were releasing something called myoglobin, a protein in muscle which has a red-like color in its elemental form, giving the appearance of bloody urine.

A short few days later, when the doc called with his diagnosis, the issue had resolved itself—the myoglobin had finished releasing and the Yorkie was peeing blood no more.

Hope you can all forgive this kittie's brief foray into political commentary for the pleasure of reading my tales.

Til' next time,

Oscar

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